Discover some inspiring adventures.

Take a look at our bucket list for a little bit of creative dreaming - we have to aspire to something, and who doesn't want to go dog-sledding?

Inspire Me

Hear our experts' advice to be prepared.

We haven't skied all of our resorts for no reason! We want to make sure your experience is up to scratch so take a look at our ski break pointers.

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Latest articles from our blog
St Anton's new ski area

The Arlberg region now holds the bragging rights as the largest lift-linked ski area in Austria, boasting 305kms of downhill slope.

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Q I’m a beginner where can I buy ski clothes? Click to reveal answer +

As a beginner you probably don’t want to spend a fortune especially if you’re not even sure you’ll like skiing yet. We’d suggest somewhere like TK Maxx to pick up some bargains or you can even rent for the first time and then pick up some deals in the spring (Two Seasons have some great discounts or any online retailer). Try renting from Ski Togs. We haven’t tried them yet but it looks easy enough to us. Failing that see if you can borrow a friend’s ski gear.

Q Are there hairdryers in the rooms? Click to reveal answer +

For our flexiski operated chalets (The Retreat, Amalien Haus and the Little Haus) you can leave your hairdryer at home safe in the knowledge that every room has one. For hotels you will have to check the ‘in room amenities’ on the hotel pages on our website, most hotels will have hairdryers but it’s always worth double checking, give us a ring if you’re still unsure.

Q What are the best resorts for beginners? Click to reveal answer +

Megeve is always great for beginners, plenty of gentle slopes and a fantastic town so it’s not just about the skiing. Courchevel is also a safe bet. Trysil in Norway offers fantastic skiing for beginners and a great ski school, learn to ski in the home of skiing! Or if you like the look of Austria then Obergurgl and Lech are nice choices.

Q How is a ski trip in the USA, Canada or Japan differ from a European one? Click to reveal answer +

We know and love Europe but sometimes you just fancy something different. I like to think of it as comparing a beach holiday in Spain to one in Barbados; essentially they're similar but there’s definitely big differences.

North America tends to be a little quieter on the après front than Europe but also quieter on the slopes with wide open bowls and incredible tree skiing along with more snow and lighter snow making for some incredible skiing. And they’re catching up on the après front – it’s just, well, a little different.

Japan is another kettle of fish. The most snow we’ve ever seen for sure. It dwarfs Europe with its snowfall even if the resorts are at sea level. Think the softest snow on the softest pistes and the deepest powder everywhere else. But if you’re going to travel all that way, it’s as much about the culture as the skiing. Super friendly people and some delicious foods to try out and in Niseko the nightlife is pretty good as well.

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