Key facts

Japanese Language
Yen Currency
2 Resorts

If you've heard just one thing about skiing in Japan it'll probably be the snow. The northern island of Hokkaido gets bucket loads of the stuff. Weather systems sweeping over the Sea of Japan from Siberia bring up to 18 metres of snow annually for some of the snowiest ski conditions on Earth. And with the quality of the snow being incredibly dry and light, it gives a firm footing to the claim that Niseko is the powder capital of the world.

The terrain tends to be more mellow than other major international resorts, but this just means that more people can enjoy the great snow. You don't have to be an expert to ski or board in Japan. Unbeatable powder coupled with fantastic tree skiing means you'll be entertained for a lifetime skiing the resorts of Hokkaido.

Three quarters of Japan is mountainous so it's no surprise that there's around 600 ski resorts in the country. Niseko being the ski capital if you like, internationally renowned for it's skiing and night-life. However skiing in Japan isn't just about the snow, with fantastic hot springs (onsen) to relax in after a day on the slopes and delicious food to sample, the friendly locals and rich culture play a big part of a trip here.

Tokyo and Kyoto are easy to get between on the bullet train and well worth a visit. The Sky Tree is a must if only to see just how huge Tokyo really is with spectacular views in every direction. From ramen to sushi to katsu curry the food is varied and delightful coupled with Hokkaido's volcanic scenery carpeted in primeval forest, Japan won't fail to amaze.

Niseko
Niseko
Niseko

During winter, Niseko becomes a paradise for powder skiing and the scenery is strikingly unusual with an abundance of snow.

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Rusutsu
Rusutsu
Rusutsu

Rusutsu is a powder purists dream; perfectly groomed pistes and tree lined gullies. Also a family favourite full of kitsch quirks and gentle slopes.

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